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Home / Altre news / Webinar: Women refugees and human trafficking in North Africa: impact and implications for security // 30/11/2022

Webinar: Women refugees and human trafficking in North Africa: impact and implications for security // 30/11/2022

The Workshop “Women refugees and human trafficking in North Africa: impact and implications for security”, co-organised by the NATO NSD-S HUB and the University of Bari, will be held on November 30th, 2022 from 9:00 to 13:30 CET. You can REGISTER HERE

It will bring together experts, academics and practitioners from North Africa to discuss how human trafficking impacts security. Particular attention will also be drawn to the poor conditions in which women refugees find themselves, and the policies developed by North African countries to tackle this issue. Regional experts will evaluate the complexity of this phenomenon and the numerous actors involved.

Background
HT is one of the major forms of transnational crime in the North African region. It also acts as a crime multiplier – its revenues, which also come from the illegal harvesting and marketing of organs, are laundered and used for selling and purchasing weapons, as well as financing terrorism, all of which can compromise international security.
Beginning with local analyses in particular, we will examine how civil societies can, together with the relevant politicians, contribute to building and implementing cooperation strategies in order to initiate prevention and safety processes capable of guaranteeing the protection of human rights, in particular of vulnerable individuals and victims. How these strategies can help break the link between human trafficking, terrorism and violence against refugee women will also be discussed. Human Trafficking is growing by 5% annually and refugee women represent a high component of this percentage. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Global Report on Trafficking in Persons, the most common form of human trafficking is sexual exploitation (79%) and the victims are predominantly women and girls.

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